Research Programs

The Hydrocephalus Association is committed to funding high quality, high impact research that addresses the priorities set forth in our Research Initiative. Our Research Programs focus on 3 main areas: Career Development, Clinical Research, and Basic Research.


Click here for Grant Opportunities


Career Development

Mentored Young Investigator Award Program

The MYI Award program began in 2009 with the dual purpose of funding promising research relevant to hydrocephalus while fostering the development of young researchers.  The award helps insure that qualified young scientists enter the field of hydrocephalus research and receive research training and experience under the guidance of highly trained, well-respected researchers who have demonstrated success in their field.  At the completion of the grant period, our goal is that these young scientists become high-caliber, productive, independent researchers with an enduring focus on research relevant to hydrocephalus.  Ultimately, it is hoped that this support will help these young scientists to make successful applications for an NIH K or R award to continue their research in hydrocephalus, thereby enriching the hydrocephalus research landscape.

Hydrocephalus Association’s Resident’s Prize

One way the Hydrocephalus Association promotes research and leadership in hydrocephalus is through our annual Resident’s Prize. This prize is awarded each year to the most promising hydrocephalus-related research paper presented by a neurosurgical resident at the Pediatric Section meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS). The prize is designed to encourage young doctors to focus their research efforts on advancing treatment and care of individuals with hydrocephalus.


 

Clinical Research

 Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network

Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network

The Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (HCRN) is a network of fourteen children’s hospitals that conduct clinical research on hydrocephalus to improve the lives of children suffering from hydrocephalus.

Adult Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (AHCRN)

Adult Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network

The Adult Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (AHCRN) is a network of eight hospitals that conduct clinical research on hydrocephalus to improve treatment for the adult forms of hydrocephalus, including transitional patients who were diagnosed as children, those who acquire hydrocephalus as adults, and patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus.

Basic Research

Innovator Awards

In 2015, HA launched the first ever Innovator Award for Investigators in Hydrocephalus
Therapeutics Research. The goal of this initiative is to provide seed funding for bold and innovative
research with the potential to transform the field of hydrocephalus through the understanding of
disease mechanisms and the development of novel therapies. Seven grants were awarded in 2015, three in 2016, and eight in 2017. HA plans to run another grant cycle in 2018!

Funding for the 2015-2017 Innovator Awards was made possible through the support of the Team Hydro and the dedicated efforts of Craig and Vicki Brown, hosts of the annual Vision Dinner.

HA Discovery Science Awards

HA has run two grant cycles (2011 and 2013) focused on the topic of CSF Production, Flow, and Regulation, Therapeutics and Diagnostics. The Research Focus Area Awards are designed to support high quality, innovative, and timely research projects by established investigators. The past two grant cycles focused on advancing the understanding and control of normal and abnormal regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production, flow, resorption, pressure, and pulsatility as they relate to the etiology, progression, and resolution of congenital or acquired forms of hydrocephalus in neonates, children, adults and/or the elderly.

The goal of this award is to increase our understanding of the fundamental mechanics of hydrocephalus.

Rudi Schulte Research Institute Award in Hydrocephalus

In 2013, HA ran a grant cycle for the Rudi Schulte Research Institute (RSRI) to fund a new CSF grant. This award is similar to our Research Focus Area CSF grants aimed at supporting novel and innovative research to better understand hydrocephalus and to lead to better diagnosis, treatment and prevention.

6 Comments for : Research Programs
    • DARRELL WHITSON
    • March 1, 2018
    Reply

    I HAVE HYDROCEPHALLUS I’M 63 YRS OLD I HAD A SHUNT INSTALLED ON JAN. 5TH OF 2018 AND I’M WONDERING WHAT MORE I CAN DO TO HELP MYSELF THE SHUNT IS WORKING IN DRAINING THE FLUID OFF MY BRAIN I HAVE BEEN BACK TO MY DR.’S TWO TIMES AND HAD THE SHUNT TURNED UP BOTH TIMES MY WALKING HAS IMPROVED A LITTLE BUT IS STILL NOT RIGHT. HOW LONG DO I HAVE TO LIVE WIH THIS CONDITION IF IT ISN’T FIXED BY THE SHUNT?
    I’M THINKING THE SHUNT WAS PUT IN PROPERLY BY DR. YINGLING AT THE SOUTHEAST HOSPITAL IN CAPE MO.

    • Susan Woodward
    • November 17, 2017
    Reply

    Any progress on overdrainage?

  1. Reply

    I am intending to search on the reason of the prevalence of this problem in Haiti.

    Marie T. Jean-Pierre, FNP, PhD student at Loma Linda University

    • Terrie Willis
    • August 17, 2017
    Reply

    I have had hydrocephalus since 5 months old 47.5 yrs. I was diagnosed at 5 months I had one revision done at 6 y.o and have had this shunt since then. I have been told it doesn’t work and hasn’t in a very long time.

    • Ronell
    • April 3, 2017
    Reply

    I’m working with a little boy that just turned 2 in January that has Hydrocephalus and isn’t talking yet. Do you have any suggestions on how I can work with him on his language skills?

      • Michelle Tetley
      • March 17, 2018
      Reply

      Hi Ronell,
      I wish you and your little boy all the best.
      As far as helping him with his language skills: read to him, sing with him, make flash cards with pictures of him and his family and those close to him (including pets.) You could even make books or picture cards about things he is interested in.
      Keeping your words short and simple can help. Also, minimise background noise if you can. This helps too.
      Sometimes using basic sign language while talking can also help.
      I used to work in child care so, these things have helped me when I was working. I also have hydrocephalus.
      Good luck.

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