PHH

$3 Million Raised for Posthemorrhagic Hydrocephalus!

The 2018 Vision Dinner was held on Friday, Nov. 2 in New York City. Generously underwritten by Craig and Vicki Brown, benefactors of the Hydrocephalus Association, the evening seeks to raise national attention about hydrocephalus and raise funds to advance hydrocephalus research.  

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Premature Baby Posthemorragic hydrocephalus

Honor Your Preemie HydroHero on World Prematurity Day

Nov. 17 is World Prematurity Day, which highlights the health challenges premature babies face at birth and beyond. For us at HA, World Prematurity Day is a way to draw attention to Posthemorrhagic Hydrocephalus (PHH), one of the most insidious forms of hydrocephalus.

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Announcing the 2018 Discovery Science Award Grantees!

The award allows these scientists to expand their research on posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH).

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New Theories in Posthemorrhagic Hydrocephalus

A recent study expands these results to posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants. Please take a moment to read more about this important research.

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New Study Seeks to Improve Outcomes After a Brain Bleed

Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is a brain bleed that occurs in approximately 3.5 per 1000 live births and remains a leading cause of mortality and lifelong morbidity in premature infants.

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Neural Tube Defects (NTD)

Learn about the genetics of neural tube defects, which can lead to hydrocephalus.

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So Many Reasons To Be Grateful

Olivia Maccoux shares her story and leads this year’s holiday drive to support the critical research work of the Hydrocephalus Association.

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Risk Factors For Posthemorrhagic Hydrocephalus

Learn about how Dr. Hannah Tully is uncovering risk and protective factors associated with the development of PHH, and the results of a large retrospective study she recently presented.

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Premature Babies from Low-income Families Face Higher Risks of Hydrocephalus

Courtney Pendleton, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, and colleagues conducted a study that found that premature babies born to low-income parents have a disproportionately high risk of developing posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH).

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