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What is Hydrocephalus? An Overview

Hydrocephalus is a chronic neurological condition that impacts over 1 million Americans, from infants to seniors. There is no cure but there are effective treatments to manage the condition.


Hydrocephalus Back to School

Back To School Time!

Back to school time can be an exciting yet stressful time for parents and kids alike. While kids may be worried about facing the academic rigors of the school year, reestablishing their friendships, parents confront concerns about new teachers and the school understanding the challenges of hydrocephalus and providing the proper support for success.


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Medical Alert IDs and Hydrocephalus

Without proper identification of a medical condition like hydrocephalus, common symptoms, such as headaches, dizziness, sleepiness and vomiting can be misdiagnosed and appropriate care could be jeopardized or delayed.


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Traveling with Hydrocephalus

As parents, we will always worry about our children, regardless of whether they have hydrocephalus or not, we’re in our neighborhood or planning a trip oversees.  Being prepared is one way to ease our minds and to give them wings and let them fly.


Hydrocephalus Video Blog

Dealing with Fear and Uncertainty

In this installment of the Hydrocephalus Association’s video blog series, Through a Mother’s Eye’s, Debby Buffa addresses the question of how to deal with the fear and uncertainty experienced by parents and caregivers supporting a loved one with hydrocephalus.


Hydrocephalus Video Blog

Transitioning from Pediatric-centered Care to Adult-centered Care for Young Adults with Hydrocephalus

In this installment of the Hydrocephalus Association’s video blog series, Through a Mother’s Eye’s, Debby Buffa addresses the question of how to make the transition from a pediatric neurosurgeon to an adult medical team to manage on-going care for hydrocephalus.


Hydrocephalus and vision loss

Papilledema, Vision Loss, and Hydrocephalus

Papilledema is an optic disc swelling that is secondary to elevated intracranial pressure around the brain associated with hydrocepahlus. The biggest concern with increased intracranial pressure is there is always the potential for visual loss secondary to the papilledema.


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