Department of Education Considers Modifications to Special Education

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Take Action: Submit your comments to DOE TODAY!

Comments due TODAY, September 20 11:59 PM (ET)

Preserve regulations that protect the Hydrocephalus Community! 

On February 24, 2017, President Trump signed Executive Order 13777 which established federal policy to alleviate unnecessary regulatory burdens on the American people. Section 3(a) of the Executive Order directs Federal agencies to establish a Regulatory Task Force. One the requirements of the Task Force is to evaluate existing regulations and make recommendations to the agency head regarding repeal, replacement or modification to existing regulations and guidance documents. The Department of Education is accepting comments on the Proposed Rule: Evaluation of Existing Regulations. Many of these regulations and guidance documents that benefit and assist the hydrocephalus community are at risk of being rescinded, modified or replaced by the Department of Education.

Below are some key issues that are at stake: 

  • Assistance to States for the Education of Children with Disabilities (Part 300)
  • Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part 303)
  • Service Obligations under Special Education Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities (Part 304)
  • Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program (Part 350)
  • Disability and Rehabilitation Research: Research Fellowships (Part 356)

Interested in learning more about the regulations and guidance the Department of Education is considering? Check out the link here.

What you can do to make a difference:

Let your voice be heard—tell your personal story. Submit your comments detailing why the Department of Education should preserve these regulations. Explain how these regulations have helped you or your family and why such guidance(s) are so important for the hydrocephalus community.

How to get involved:

Submit your comments HERE. All submission are due TODAY, September 20 11:59 PM (ET). Directions on how to submit your comment can be found here.

22 Comments for : Department of Education Considers Modifications to Special Education
    • Courtney Hardie
    • September 21, 2017
    Reply

    My daughter has had or currently reciecve one or more of these items on this list. She is a 24 week premi that is 9 years old now and she would be the child she is without there services. I was told by doctors she would never walk talk eat or anything and with help she has or currently still receiving she does everything that i was told she wouldnt.

    • Eddie Castro
    • September 21, 2017
    Reply

    This would be unfair and inhumane. These kids require and depend on the resources being offered to them and taking this away is not right.

    • Natalia Penas
    • September 21, 2017
    Reply

    The proper care and education of children, should be the number 1 priority of any country and children with disabilities should be care for even more. This is why it is so important to make sure programs that help our children are funded. Every child deserve a happy and healthy childhood.

    • Linda Thompson
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    I am the grandparent of a boy with hydrocephalus diagnosed at 18 months when he could not walk, talk or hold himself in a sitting position. Today, after intensive early intervention and SPED preschool services required by law he is on grade level in all academics and normally functioning in large and fine motor skills. Without the intensive early intervention he would likely be identified as physically and cognitively impaired and functioning at a preschool level for life. He’s 7 with no SPED services!! The fiscal costs of early intervention saved a lifetime of medical and educational costs for the schools, state, and federal government. There is no higher importance than the future of a child–every child has value and has the right to be given the educational opportunity to be all that s/he can be. All children matter!!

  1. Reply

    Look, I have a daughter with Hydrocephalus. She has a 504 in place due to chronic migraines and missing school so much for surgeries. Having these things in place to help our hydrowarriors is amazing. However, it is not just important for them. There are so many children that struggle with learning while having a disability. Honestly, I feel more should be done to help them. I have another daughter who has a global development delay. Honestly, we are still unsure of what is causing these delays. Without her schools special education program she would not have been able to attend school period. It is impossible to expect children with learning disabilities to fall into line learning like everyone else. All children learn at their own pace, but our children with disabilities would be hidden in the midst of everyone else. Unable to vocalize their struggles because noone is able to listen. Not only should they keep them, they should be added too. We as parents want so much for our children to be happy, healthy, and succeed. However, if not given the ability to learn at their own pace and how things work for them, they will inevitably fail. Support not only our hydrowarriors, but all of those children out there that need these regulations.

    • Anna-Lisa Odgers
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    As a parent of a child with special needs, it is vital we give as many resources to our most vulnerable citizens. Please expand Medicaid/Medical and ACA. As well as dept of education allocation of funds to our children

    • Verena
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    Without early intervention my son who was born at 24 weeks wouldn’t be were he is today!
    Special ed is needed by many students to succeed. It allows all kids to get the education that they deserve and need to thrive, not only in school but to reach their potential in life. To deny any child an education is to deprive the child the opportunity to grow and achieve their potential, whatever that may be. Denying them every opportunity also plays into negative stereotypes about what is possible for them to achieve. Of course, without education they will be ‘less than’, which doesn’t benefit the children, the family or society. No one knows what kids w/disabilities are capable of doing, especially when not given the chance to shine.

    • Ibeth
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    These services are very much needed for all children with hydrocephalus, because it gives them a better quality of life. My friends son has hydrocephalus and these services are crucial to his development and his learning abilities..

    • amy parker
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    Hi we are the Parker family and our son is one. He was just recently diagnosed with Walker-Warburg syndrome which with this diagnosis most don’t make it to one. Early intervention has been absolutely amazing in his development. We were told he would not learn or do anything. Well as of today our head control is coming along amazing and although he isn’t reaching for things he has learned to push things away. His visual tracking has improved 100%. Our ot always gives us ideas on how to help and different positions to put our son in and the reasoning behind it. Early intervention is amazing and I am so glad it exists and we hope to continue with it.

    • Stephanie L.
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    The Hydrocephalus Community has helped many families through their tough journeys. Taking resources away from those whom need it is unhumane. Tons of families will be effected by these changes, therefore many who may not even know they need help will lose the opportunity to make early progress!!!

    • Kari Chao
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    Early intervention services were essential to my son’s development into a mainstreamed, able-bodied individual who is on track to become a productive (and gifted) member of society. He has a congenital brain malformation of the cerebellum – without early intervention services (OT, PT and Speech) he would have languished far behind his neurotypical peers and that developmental gap would likely never have been closed. Don’t abandon these programs. They are lifelines and they work.

    • Michelle Higgins
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    There is just no way around it – my son would be nowhere near where he is now without Early Intervention and Special Education programs. He was born with severe brain damage. He is non-verbal. But through EI and Special Ed he has learned to read and even understand basic math. The daily therapy he gets at school allows him to learn new OT skills that have opened up sign language abilities, and PT skills that allow him independent movement. Without these programs, no one could afford to pay enough specialty teachers and therapists to make this kind of progress. Private insurance certainly won’t pay for it. Why on Earth would we go backwards and have these kids end up vegetables in institutions?

  2. Reply

    Both my children received early intervention for very different reasons. As a parent and as a teacher I believe it is vital to the future success of any child not meeting milestones and to our nations future. So many kids just need proper diagnosis and therapeutic strategies to succeed the same as their peers. Other children may never be typical but EI gives them and their families a good start in life. It is hard enough being a parent of a special needs child but being one who is alone and without strategies is terrifying. Please keep this a priority of our education system.

    • Carole Allsop Connors
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    My grandson has hydrocephalus and has had 3 brain surgeries.
    He began early intervention services with physical, speech and sensory therapy, at home. At age 3 he started the early intervention program at a regular school. He began in January.
    He thrived in the program from the beginning, learning to ride the school bus to and from school.
    He began kindergarten on time and has blossomed into a social interactive, talkative, sharing.child. He knows numbers, colors, shapes, reads and taught himself Morse code. Yes you read that correctly.
    This year he began 2nd grade, on Monday he brought home a math test of 100%.
    I am asking for these services to continue for all the children in programs and for future ones. All children deserve to be the best they can be.

    • Kayla Stolle
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    We would not be where we are today if it wasn’t for early intervention!! We use first steps PT and OT for our twins and it has made a HUGE difference.

    • sam kinley
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    Early intervention is a great help to my 8 month old who has a disability, he is still immobile but thanks to early intervention he has learnt to sit unassisted an is slowly learning to crawl

    • Amanda
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    Let them babies rest… Revisions are hard… Its are brain people

  3. Reply

    My child has benefited from being in ECI and also continues to benefit from in school accommodations. My child NEEDS these assistance since it’s a “for life” disability. Please do not take away his chance to grow and advance as a “normal” child!

  4. Reply

    My daughter would not be where she is without the early childhood invention programs. We started her with these programs at 6 months old. Please keep this program! You will be doing many many children a disservice by taking this away!!

    • Natalie
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    My son was born with a condition. Because of that he is provided with three therapists through early intervention. When he was born his head was double the size it should have been. Because of services through early intervention he now has the ability to sit up and function as a baby should. Getting rid of services such as this is absolutely ridiculous and can not happen.

    • Jennifer White
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    My daughter was born with Hydrocephalus. In vermont there is nothing that considers it a disability . Because of her Hydrocephalus she lacks balance, motor skills and comprehension. She needs more special education help. She received help in kindergarten for physical therapy and motor skills. I hope more is done to provide special care for those with Hydrocephalus in the school system.

    • Sharon Pagendarm
    • September 20, 2017
    Reply

    My son, Eric, started speech therapy in a special day class at 3. Eric is moderately hearing impaired in both ears. Because of this early intervention, he had “graduated” from speech therapy before starting kindergarten. Please consider the research. Early invention is very effective and helps many kids not to need services for a long time.

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